Puddings & Toyboys

A blog about my beautiful budgies.

Monthly Archives: October 2017

Extreme Moult Experience

So, right on schedule, we had the annual Extreme Moult Experience.

This is the 3rd year running this has happened.  It began when Bezukhov suffered this affliction in October 2015 (click here to read that story).  Last year, Bezukhov upped the stakes by introducing compulsory crop-feeding to keep him going (click here to read that story).  This year, Bezukhov pulled out all the stops & managed to scare us all.

Not counting the final follow-up visit, we had clocked up 16 vet visits/crop feeds in 14 days.   In total, there were 17 vet visits in 17 days which clearly averages as 1 visit a day.  Astounding statistics.

On the 19th September, Bezukhov dropped many large feathers, including his remaining tail feather.  His smaller, fluffier feathers were also beginning to fall off him.  When offered millet, he declined.  His poops were also going a dark green colour.  It was time to call in the vet.  When the vet examined him on the 20th, she said his head was inflamed where pin feathers (not yet noticeable) were about to come through.  Instead of sensibly gradually moulting out his feathers, he decided to drop them all at the same time & grow new ones.  His body was clearly not able to cope with this, hence his lack of appetite (& subsequent dramatic weight loss) & extreme lethargy.

 

Knowing the pattern from previous years, although his weight was initially healthy at 50g, the vet began with a crop feed in an attempt to ‘get ahead of the game’.  You can see from the table below, that things did not go as well as we had hoped.

 

The main complication this time was that Bezukhov was repeatedly vomiting.  He had a crop wash on the 26th September to rule out reasons other than an extreme moult.  This came back clear, but we were still left with the vomiting problem.  It was thought it might have been a side affect to the antibiotics, in which case we would have to wait a few days until after the last dose to see if this was the case.  His weight continued to fall, despite having crop feeds.

Thursday the 28th September was the worse day of all.  He looked terrible & I feared he would not last the night…. but last the night he did & his further loss of 2g, to a critically low (for Bezukhov) 38g, explained his worsening state.  It was at this point we increased the crop feeding to twice a day.  On the Friday, he thankfully vomited less & from the Saturday all but stopped.  This was indeed a good sign & we hoped it would be the turning point, which indeed, it was.

You can see from the table above, that Bezukhov’s last weight was 41g that he had kept stable for a few days.  He still needs to put on weight but is now in much better spirits & eating by himself so we are hopeful that he will be his slightly tubby self soon.

 

 

Remembering Phineas on his adoption day

Phineas came into our home on this day, 5 years ago.  Here is a video of him, my finger & some preening:

 

Missing you, our little man.

Always in our thoughts.

♥♥♥

phinny-logo2

 

Guest Post: The legendary Ian and Marshall (not forgetting Eric …)

Regular followers of this blog will be familiar with the legendary Sharing Sausages, who, over the years, graciously shared their wild grass with my flock.  Here is a tribute post to them written by follower rosebudgie.


THE LEGENDARY IAN AND MARSHALL (not forgetting Eric …)

It had been many years since I’d had budgies in my life, and by 2007 the pressure was building. Then I saw this picture on a forum:

Ian on the left

 

I can’t say for sure, because there was a whole brood of similar chicks, but I’ve always felt that Ian was the budgie on the left: there’s a certain look in his eye … Anyhow, I drove to Oxford to meet the family (born in a big cage in a living room) and chose Ian to take away with me. Even before I got him home, I realised that, as I worked full-time, it would be crazy to try to keep a budgie on his own, and that I would need to return to Oxford as soon as possible to get him a friend.

Ian was absolutely over the moon when I brought his brother Marshall back the following Saturday: kissing him, preening him … he couldn’t get enough of him. It’s remembering this that has totally convinced me that, in the vast majority of cases, budgies do need to be with budgies.

For the next ten years, Ian and Marshie colonized the living room. Theoretically their home was the Mini Manor but, especially in their younger years, most of the time they were out and about, flying from cage top to picture frame to window perch to curtain rail, tearing the leaves off my (non-toxic-to-budgies) house plant till it was completely naked.

From the window they would observe the seasons changing:

 

And they particularly loved to kiss and canoodle in the curtains:

Ian and Marshall canoodling

 

As they got older, podgier and lazier, even though the cage was usually left open, they often couldn’t be bothered to leave it after an initial morning flight. I set up a webcam so that, when I was at work, I and their other fans (including, of course, Sweetpea) could watch them eating, snoozing and – in Ian’s case particularly – loudly addressing the nation from the perch in full view of the camera.

Apart from the odd spat, the boyz got on wonderfully well – Read more of this post