Puddings & Toyboys

A blog about my beautiful budgies.

Category Archives: Lennie

Happy 4th Adoption-day, Perry & Lennie!

It was four years ago on this day that I brought home these two beautiful, blue birds.

Happy adoption-day, Perry & Lennie!

We love you lots!

 

Introducing Morty Moriarty!

Please welcome our new addition to the flock, Morty Moriarty!

Morty Moriarty

 

He is a rehome & was dropped off here by his concerned owners who felt he was not getting the attention he deserved.  He arrived on Friday the 16th October, with a large cage & a bag of food, toys & accessories.  After a little over three weeks of quarantine in my bedroom, on Sunday 8th November, I wheeled him into the room to meet Perry & Lennie.

 

I have not let Morty Moriarty out yet.  Though Perry & Lennie have had a few days with him, getting used to the extra noise, so far they have not gone to visit him.  Moriarty is the other side of Dalai’s cage (that seems to be the name for the Silver Villa now…) which is quite a trek given that their health/flying problems have curtailed their movements somewhat.

Perry & Lennie’s cage | Dalai’s cage | Moriarty’s cage

 

Nevertheless, on the first day, Lennie did venture out onto the top of their cage door & peered across at Moriarty, so I am hoping he will pluck up a bit more courage in the next few days & maybe go into Dalai’s cage to get a closer look.

 

Moriarty is less than one year old & still has a young outlook.  He is very lively.  He is not afraid of hands though does like to bite, however, he loves bells, so if he is on my hand, biting, I just steer him towards a bell & he is distracted!

I am looking forward to telling you more about him & also reporting on new flock dynamics which I am hoping will be all positive!

Moriarty

 

 

Head rub

Lennie found that rubbing his head on the frame of the open door helped give him some relief from some pin feathers….

 

 

Update on Perry’s health

In my last post on this subject (click here) I reported about Perry’s ‘turns’.  We have had further developments.

On the 4th July, Perry had, what I would describe as a ‘Twitchfest’.  He twitched, though not violently, off & on all day, but settled by bedtime.  I was on edge the whole time, anticipating that he would get worse.

Perry

Perry’s next, more significant, episode was on Saturday, the 22nd August.  At around 11am, he began twitching, & a couple of those were major enough to propel him off the perch.  At one point, he was hanging from the perch by one foot.  He seemed okay after about 15 minutes.  However, about two & a half hours later, the twitches began again, but this time they were throwing him off the perch, on average every 30 seconds (sometimes the frequency between was longer, sometimes shorter).  Lennie was sensible & went into Dalai’s cage, so I locked him in there for the duration.

For about an hour the twitches continued, at varying levels of intensity.  Each time his movement was from his left to the right, so I could predict where he would go/land.  Sometimes he would have a few minutes where he was just twitching & able to stay on the perch.  He pooped throughout, but a watery substance.  Through it all, he did not make a sound.  He was completely aware & scared as he clearly did not know what was happening to him.  The times he landed on the bottom of the cage he immediately made his way back up.  By 3pm they were subsiding & he was able to preen & behave a bit more normally, by which time, Lennie joined him again.

Things had settled down by the Monday, but nevertheless, I spoke to the vet, & she suggested adding calcium to their water as they were both still moulting.

New cage set up L to R: hospitalisation cage, ‘home’, Dalai’s cage

The next episode was Saturday the 12th September (I am starting to dread Saturdays!). He seemed extra quiet that morning & when I offered him a spinach leaf, he had to turn his head at a strange angle to eat it.  This alerted me & I decided to dust off the quarantine cage & prepare it for possible hospitalisation purposes.  Later that day, he spasmed, fell to the cage floor & was rolling around.  I carefully picked him up & put him in the spare cage.  He came out of the spasm & I placed him on a perch, where he was very still.  His balance was very off & he fell off the perch a few times but at least did not have far to fall in the newly set up cage, & the bottom has extra padding.  Occasionally, he would turn his head from side to side & his eyes were flickering.

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Autumn Banner 2020

I am pleased to report that Perry, Lennie & our dearly departed Dalai, feature on the autumn-themed banner of a budgerigars forum!

There is a competition each season to select a new banner, with the winner voted for by the members.  The following is the winner:

 

You can see it has a Shakespearean, three witches theme, with, appropriately, three budgies looking like they are cooking up some trouble.

The banner can be seen in situ here: http://budgerigarsforum.proboards.com/ over autumn.  Do take a look & have a browse around the friendly & informative forum. 🙂

 

Lessons from the wild?

One day, towards the end of May, I noticed some unusual activity outside the window & when I took a closer look it seemed a baby blackbird was trying out short, circular flights from the tree, each time, making a wider circle.  (I later saw it on the grass, running up to mum & dad requesting food).  As I watched, I said aloud to Perry, that he should do that, to build flying confidence & when I turned to look at him, he came out the cage & had a little fly!  He made about 3 or 4 short flights between the cages, with one particular attempt circling out into the room, very much like the blackbird did from the tree.

Perry

 

Both Perry & Lennie have always noticed what goes on outside the window, so perhaps it is not too far fetched for me to think that Perry saw the young blackbird too & was inspired with its efforts.  (He definitely was not listening to me, as I have been telling him for ages to take short flights to build confidence!)

Perry’s little lump has caused some clumsiness &, I believe, lack of confidence in his flying.  He has always been a little on the lazy side regarding flying, but there is nothing wrong with his wings.  It was lovely to see him go further afield & it helped his confidence as later that day he flew from his cage to the landing platform on the far side of Dalai’s cage (almost to the playgym).

That same day, Lennie also ventured further than he has in a long time.  He was on the peg perch & decided to climb up, rather than down, & found himself on top of Dalai’s cage for the first time since Dalai’s passing.

Unfortunately, a big bird flew past the window which worried him, so he returned home quickly!

Lennie on the peg, talking to Perry

 

Lennie and the Long Perch

Recently, to encourage Perry & Lennie to explore a bit more outside their comfort zone, I rigged up a long perch between the two cages.

As the cages are both the same & alongside each other, when their main, middle doors are open, it lends itself to having a perch connecting across them.  It just needed to be a long perch, which fortunately I have.  Once in place, Perry & Lennie naturally ignored it, but at least were not scared of it.  Extra encouragement was needed, so I pegged some seeding grass to it.  Eventually, Lennie decided it was worth braving this new perch for the treat.

When I saw him jump on the perch, I grabbed the camera & filmed:

 

As you can see there was the obligatory faffing about, a brief chew of the prize, followed by tucking into grass nearer to him!

 

Lennie’s feather problem

During the vet visit on the 16th June for Perry’s ‘turns’ (click here to read), I also asked the vet to check Lennie’s wing feathers.

The last time the vet checked his wing feathers was a year ago when he was already having problems flying.  At the time, it was thought a severe moult had caused the problems.  Since then, Lennie has grown wing feathers back again but also lost some, never getting to a point that he could fly properly.  The feathers he dropped also looked of poor quality.  In addition, we had the ‘crime scene‘ with a suspected broken blood feather.  It seemed appropriate to ask the vet to take another look.

Prior to her physical examination of him, I showed her many of the feathers he had lost.  She identified stress bars & also evidence of chewing.  Stress bars were not too surprising as Lennie is a bit of a worrywart.  The chewing was more concerning & raised lots of questions, primarily, was he chewing because there was something wrong with the feather or was he chewing on a healthy feather & if so, why?

On examining Lennie, apart from his strange feathers & whopping weight (a staggering 73g!) he appeared healthy.  She took some sample feathers for him to be tested for Psittacine Beak and Feather Disease (PBFD) which fortunately came back negative.

When the vet returned the following day to check on Perry, as a precaution, she gave them both treatment for (feather) mites, which I followed up on the 13th July.

 

Without further tests, it is difficult to establish the root cause of Lennie’s feather problem.  It is possible he has a psychological issue given he suffers from stress & anxiety.  Even if his feather problem is resolved, his weight gain will not help with his flying ability.  So, this continues to be a problem to monitor…

 


Sample of feathers:

 

Fever

Not long ago, I posted that Perry had a ‘scary turn‘.  Unfortunately, this happened again (almost 4 weeks later).

Perry

On the evening of Monday, June 15th, at around 9:20pm, Perry had another series of ‘turns’, similar to before.  He seemingly lost control of his body & was hurling himself around the cage.  At one point he made a strange, tinny, sound.  When the worst of it was over, he settled on the perch.  However, around midnight, when the lights were dim & their cover was over, he once again fell off the perch & when I turned the light up & investigated, the same thing was happening.  This time, there was less falling (or propelling himself) off the perch but he was twitching, mostly with his head going to one side.  I could see his body wanted to follow the direction his head was taking.

I dimmed the lights again & put the cover down (halfway) in hope that the darkness would be less stimulating & more calming for him.  He was restless until around 2am, when he appeared to settle.  Nevertheless, I slept overnight in the same room to make sure he was okay.  Lennie, understandably, was stressed by his friend’s behaviour & sat on the swing to keep out the way.  We made it through the night without further incident.

You will not be surprised to hear that the vet visited the following day (Tuesday).

She asked many questions about the form Perry’s ‘turns’ took.  I will note the questions below, because at a time when you feel helpless, you could actually observe something that will be key to diagnosing the problem.  When the vet examined Perry, the first thing she noticed was his very high temperature.  It was critical to bring this down within the next 48 hours.  She gave him an injection (Meloxidyl) & also left me with medication (Loxicom) to give orally twice a day for two days.  In case the temperature was caused by an infection, she also put him on a course of antibiotics (Baytril).  She arranged to visit the next day to check his temperature. His weight, similar to last time, was 54g.

Lennie

(Whilst she was here, I asked her to look at Lennie’s wing feathers but I will leave that for another post.)

After the visit & into the next day, they were both very, very quiet & not going to the seed pots to eat (Lennie was stressed), so I offered millet & seeded grass at regular intervals, which they ate.

Thankfully, when the vet took Perry’s temperature about 24 hours later, it was normal!  This was such a relief!  I was to continue with the Loxicom as a precaution, & he still had antibiotics in the water.  The vet said that it may take him a few days to recover as the high temperature had put a strain on his body.

It is possible the temperature had nothing to do with Perry’s ‘turns’, but it obviously needed to be taken care of.  A possibility is that his lump pushes on a nerve that triggers the ‘turn’.  At best, the ‘turns’ are caused by an infection in the kidney that is pumping out toxins, in which case the antibiotics will sort it out.

It is now a few days since the vet came & I have not witnessed any more incidents.  Perry & Lennie are eating by themselves again & gradually getting back to normal.

 

~~~~~

Questions to bear in mind when your bird is having a seizure:

  • Was he/she aware of his/her surroundings during the seizure/s.
  • Did his/her head turn in a circle or to one side?  If to the side, which side?  Was it always the same side?
  • Did he/she make a sound during the seizure & if so, what kind of sound?
  • Did he/she poop or vomit during the seizure?

 

Greeting the grass

Since our deliveries of seeding grass, Lennie has become more demanding & dare I say it, greedy.

When he decides it is time for the grass or he has eaten what I have put out (including ‘helping’ Perry with his portion) & believes it is time for the next course, he shouts… & shouts…. & shouts!  He also keeps looking through the big, middle cage door, in anticipation of it coming.

Lennie waiting for a treat

 

When he sees me coming with the grass, he jumps about with excitement and sometimes comes out onto the door landing platform to greet the grass.

Occasionally, he may be quite satisfied with his lot but when he hears the tap running in the kitchen he links it to me rinsing off the grass.  It is an unfortunate link because, of course, I could be doing a number of other unrelated grass things in the kitchen!  So, I try not to run the tap for too long at a time, especially if the grass has run out!