Puddings & Toyboys

A blog about my beautiful budgies.

Tag Archives: anti-inflammatory

Corn flour is essential

Just 8 days after seeing the vet for Lennie’s health problems, I was back at her clinic.

All initially seemed fine on the morning of the 2nd November.  Normally, I would let Perry in with Moriarty where they could get their morning flirt out of the way without interruption from Lennie.  This went ahead as usual but I noticed it ended quicker than usual, & Moriarty wanted to go & say good morning to Lennie.  This meant Perry was on his own in Moriarty’s cage.

Not long after, I noticed the tip of his beak was red.

Now was the time for some intense observation.

I thought I saw a flash of something dark around his preening gland area.  I wondered if he had a broken blood feather.  Sure enough it was not long before, I started seeing spots of blood on the bottom of the cage…  Then bigger drops.

More blood from Perry

I rang the vet hoping there was a cancellation for a home visit, which there was not.  She was already out doing home visits but would be back at the clinic in about an hour or so, so they suggested I make my way there.  I immediately covered Perry in corn flour.  He was bleeding as I was doing this (the place looked like a crime scene afterwards).  I could not quite work out where it was coming from so just pressed my finger in certain places & if it came out red, I shoved corn flour in that area.  There seemed to be a spot below the preening gland that was bleeding.  I put him in the travel cage.  Fortunately, the corn flour temporarily stopped the bleeding.  The cab ride would be at least 30 minutes, so I put some corn flour in my bag in case it was needed on route.  We got to the clinic about half an hour before the vet.  It was not until about 5 or 10 minutes before she took him in, that I saw a drop of blood on the bottom of his cage – so the corn flour held up well.

It seemed like forever that Perry was in with the vet.  The longer he was gone, the more worried I was getting.

It turned out the bleed was from a broken blood feather on the left side of the main tail.  The feather itself was not in situ & to date, still has not been found.  (It is possible there was not blood on it when it came out, so I may have missed it).

There was quite a big hole left by the feather & the area was inflamed & bruised.  By that time, the bleeding was heavy so the vet cauterized the feather follicles to stop it.  She also removed some of the surrounding feathers.  She gave Perry an anti-inflammatory injection & also made sure he was well hydrated.  The vet said several times that it was absolutely the right thing to bring him as soon as we did.

 

We finally got home early afternoon.  Perry started chirping to Lennie & Moriarty as I brought him into the lounge.  I left him in the travel cage for about an hour as he seemed comfortable there (knowing he was back home).  Moriarty was going mad, wanting to give him a kiss but I think he too calmed down a bit just seeing that Perry was home again.  Both Moriarty & Lennie were locked in Perry & Lennie’s cage.  Whilst Perry was resting I took the opportunity to clean up Moriarty’s cage.  When Perry started to stir a bit, I offered my finger & he came out, so I put him into Moriarty’s cage.  To try & get some normality back, I let Moriarty in at intervals so as not to tire Perry out.

Perry was quiet for the rest of the day but in the evening had some water & also tucked into some millet.  I checked on him during the night & he was stable.  The vet nurse rang first thing in the morning to see how he was.  Importantly, there was no further blood loss.  The anti-inflammatory was due to wear off 24-48 hours after administration, leaving the sore, bruised area which will take a little longer to heal.  So far, Perry has continued to recover well.

 

I would like to end this post by recommending that all who have birds should have a tub of corn flour in their medicine cabinet.  You never know when it might come in handy.  Without corn flour Perry may not have made it to the vet.  Lastly, I would also like to say a big thank you to my vet who immediately understood the gravity of the situation & responded as quick as she could & was a star!

Corn flour

 

Lennie unwell again

On Wednesday, the 20th October, Lennie was showing similar signs to two months back – a loss of appetite & very green poops.

Lennie unwell, with Moriarty & Perry

Lennie ate some spinach

Moriarty & Lennie interacting

I rang the vet but the earliest home visit appointment I could get was for the Monday but because I was concerned, they said the vet would ring me back.  When we got to speak the following morning, she had already arranged to fit in a home visit later that day, the 21st.

Unlike last time, this time Lennie had a high temperature.  The vet gave him an anti-inflammatory injection & a course of antibiotics.  She said it may take 48 hours before there were any signs of improvement.  That would take us to Saturday, where if need be I could take him to her clinic in the morning.  The vet also pointed out that she could feel a strange mass under his fat in the belly area, that she suspected may be a hernia.  Whether this was causing his current problems or was unrelated, we do not know.

By the Saturday morning he really was not any better.  At best he had a brief preen, but he still was not eating.  Unfortunately, I could not get transport arranged in time to go to the clinic.  I had feeding formula left from the last time Lennie was ill so I attempted to feed him some but I got more around his beak & on my jumper than inside him.  That evening he ate about 6 seeds which was a monumental effort from him.

On the Sunday (24th) he had a good glug of his antibiotics both in the morning & the evening so he was definitely well hydrated.  During the day, he ate a few seeds & a few tiny bites of celery.  He also chirped a little.  These were all encouraging signs.  However, he was still playing with his food a lot & not actually eating it, & was sitting hunched up.  Poops were still an awful mess of green.  He made another effort in the evening to eat more seeds.

We made it to the Monday.  Lennie was still barely eating, though he managed a tiny bit of apple.  He had been ignoring the baby corn & was chewing the stalk of the millet rather than eating the seeds.

Fortunately, the vet could confirm his temperature was back to normal.  As expected, he had lost weight, about 7g from her previous visit.  She gave him a crop feed for a boost.  We booked another visit for the Thursday.

Over the next few days he gradually started eating more & was better in himself, & interacting with Perry & Moriarty.  He even managed a bath, so by the time Thursday (28th) came, I felt confident enough to cancel the vet visit.

So, we are back to normal again.  It is difficult to manage health problems when it is not clear what the cause is.  We can only do our best with the information we have.

Lennie eating baby corn after a bath

 

Obligatory poop pictures:

 

 

Bezukhov’s last week

We happily celebrated Bezukhov’s 8th birthday.   We did not know that just hours later things would take a bad turn.

The following morning, on the 28th June, as I uncovered them, I noticed Bezukhov was not himself.  He was quiet & was not eating.  There seemed to be an absence of overnight poops too.  I was concerned enough to call Ms Independent Vet (IV).

After a thorough examination, she suspected he was constipated & could feel a mass that suggested that, along with dried poops just inside his vent.  She administered fluids (orally & by injection under the skin).  Additionally, she gave him an anti-inflammatory injection & a vitamin B boost.  At best, this was simply constipation that would clear within 48 hours.  At worst, something else, something sinister, was causing the constipation.

During the day, I offered lots of different foods: fennel, apple, spinach, basil, celery & millet.  Fennel is his go-to food when not well so it was not a good sign that he refused it.

The following day, he managed a few seeds & a tiny piece of celery leaf & basil.  He seemed quite weak & was constantly fiddling with his bottom area.  At bedtime he ate about 15-20 seeds & also had a slurp of water.

On the 30th, he had slightly more seeds & carried on drinking his water.  He had pooped overnight.  The poops were green & sludgy, so really not good, however it suggested that any blockage was clearing.  He continued to gradually improve, so much so, that the next day (1st July) he started chirping a little & had a brief flirt with Dalai.  He felt well enough to fly over to the playgym & also the window perch.  His poops were still a mess but at least he was pooping.  He was still, in the main, lethargic.  I was still offering all the vegetables listed above, along with broccoli & cucumber.

 

However, the next day (2nd July), he seemed to take a few steps back.  Ms IV visited & thought he seemed a lot better & brighter than when she last saw him (4 days previous).  Though I agreed that he was better than on the 28th, I explained that he was better the previous day so had got worse again.  She said his insides felt clearer & less blocked.  His poops were still of concern & she wondered if perhaps the constipation had caused bacteria to grow.  I was to collect his poops over the next few days in case it was helpful to send them for testing.  She gave him another anti-inflammatory injection & something for nausea.  She also prescribed antibiotics in water for a few days (given that he seemed to be drinking again, which he was not before).

It was all very confusing & worrying…  Read more of this post

Grapes, tomatoes & medicine

As previously reported (click here) Cagney was taken into hospital on the afternoon of Saturday 22nd August, specifically for a barium x-ray.  This would entail an overnight stay.

I returned home from the vets, without Cagney, feeling wretched.  I could not have felt worse.  Actually, I did feel worse, when Bezukhov looked at me & saw that I had not brought home his best buddy.  His expression was a mixture of confusion, betrayal & sadness.

Bezukhov visiting Phineas

Bezukhov visiting Phineas

I was undecided whether to let Bezukhov & Phineas out for a fly as I did not want to confuse things further.  Plus, I was expecting to go out again later.  In the end, Bezukhov was flying madly about the Manor so I relented & let him out.  He immediately went over to Phinny’s cage to chat to him.  In the meantime I waited for the phone call from Ms Exotic Hospital Vet (EHV).

She rang around 7pm that evening to say Cagney had had the first stage of the barium x-ray & the next part would not happen for another 4 hours so I could visit him anytime before then.  I packed an overnight bag for him with his brand of seed, pellets, sugar snap peas & grated carrot.  I also packed a water bottle & seed pot that fitted the travel cage.  We (myself & my mother) arrived at the hospital around 20:30.  We were shown into a visitors room whilst the nurse went to get Cagney.  He looked very much the same but very, very sleepy.  We talked to him & told him what Bezukhov & Phineas had been up to.  He started to preen a little & then, much to our delight, ate some millet.  I like to think that our visit was welcome.  We had to leave eventually but as he was having treatment during the night I knew he was being looked after.

The next thing was to wait until the morning to hear how the tests went.

In the morning, I let Bezukhov out early.  He seemed troubled to be in the Manor on his own & needed to be out.  I also let Phineas out as he had spent the previous day locked up.  Occasionally they have a little flirt (initiated by Bezukhov) but under normal circumstances it does not go far as Cagney investigates & interrupts proceedings (vice versa – if Cagney flirts with Phineas, Bezukhov interrupts).  Without Cagney’s presence, the flirting was continued unhindered to the point that Bezukhov regurgitated to Phineas!  Evidence shown in this video:

A vet rang later that morning to say that Cagney was doing well.  The barium x-ray did not show up any obstruction.  However, Cagney was now passing faeces.  He had eaten a little & was preening.  She suggested he have antibiotics & metacam (anti-inflammatory) to help bring his temperature down.  I could pick him up that afternoon after a consultation with another vet.

It was a relief to see Cagney again.  He looked well considering all he had been through.  There were halved grapes pushed through the cage bars which was possibly another ordeal as grapes are scary.  At the bottom of his cage was half a cherry tomato.  That would have been the first time he has seen a tomato.  There was a curly green leaf, possibly kale, too.

The vet confirmed that he is to take antibiotics daily & metacam orally once a day.  They gave Cagney metacam when I was there which meant his next dose would be 24 hours later at 5pm.  I said I prefer to give the medicine in the morning so they said it would be better to wait until the morning after.  They suggested I book a follow-up visit with Ms EHV for the Tuesday.

Finally, after a very long 24 hours, I could take my lovely toyboy home.

To be continued

 

 

Limp toes

I am thinking of renaming this blog “The Veterinary Chronicles”…

Yes, you guessed it, we have visited the vet again.  This time it was Cagney; he hurt his foot.  The last time this happened was just before Christmas.  On that occasion he recovered quickly from the bruising he had sustained.

Cagney in travel cage hanging by dodgy foot

Cagney in travel cage hanging by dodgy foot

Cagney's right foot not gripping properly

Cagney’s right foot not gripping properly

Close up of dodgy foot

Close up of dodgy foot

Cagney after vet visit

Cagney after vet visit

A few days ago I noticed Cagney limping.  There seemed to be something wrong with his right leg.  At one point, when he was on top of the Manor, I could see under his foot & it looked red.  Later on that day I managed to grab him & attempted to smear some aloe vera on his foot.  He was very wriggly (clearly he had been taking lessons from the Master of Wriggling, Bezukhov!)  He also felt very little.  Was this because I am used to holding Bezukhov who is now quite ‘solid’ or has he been losing weight?  His right foot seemed odd too, though I could not work out why (the wriggling did not help).  As the day wore on he struggled, so much so that I rang the vet to make an appointment.

The day before the vet visit, he appeared to improve though I did wonder if he had simply worked out ways to get around without putting stress on the dodgy leg.  I decided to go ahead with the visit anyway, which was yesterday, the 21st.

Of course the visit was only to go ahead on the proviso that I could actually catch Cagney.  I was fortunate that Cagney & Bezukhov thought I was ‘going in’ to catch Bezukhov for his every-other-day medication but I surprised them both by grabbing Cagney!  I popped him in the travel cage ready for his jaunt.  With the way he was climbing around the cage it was apparent something was still very wrong with his foot.  His toes seemed floppy.

Ms Exotic Hospital Vet (EHV) gave him an examination.  Other than his foot, all appeared well.  He weighed a healthy 47 grams (surprised me – I thought he would be be a lot less).  She trimmed his beak & his toenails.  His toenails were long though not as long as they have been in the past.  We assume he gets them caught, thereby pulling on his leg & causing an injury.  Ms EHV confirmed that the two outer toes on his right foot were affected & the ‘floppiness’ was most probably caused by stretched or strained ligaments.

She gave him an anti-inflammatory injection & said that it could take many weeks for his foot to heal.  It is also likely he will be left with some weakness in that area.  She gave me some Metacam to give him (orally) once a day for the next few days.  (I am not sure how administering of that will happen).

On our return, Cagney was welcomed with lots of shouting, although quite a lot of that was Phineas squawking as I had abandoned him before he could have his morning constitutional.  I made some perch adjustments in the Manor so Cagney has a soft rope perch to roost on.  Hopefully he will get a chance to rest his foot & his toes will return to full working order.

(Click on photos to enlarge)

Just for the record, here is a video of Cagney on the swinging perch the day before his visit to the vet.  You can see his foot is not functioning properly, although it does not stop him playing with the beads.

 


 

 

 

 

Bruising, bleeding, chasing & a temporary truce

Cagney has hurt his foot again.

Cagney holding up right foot

Cagney holding up right foot

Yesterday I noticed that he was holding his right foot up.  He was limping too.  This has happened before & I think it is because his long toenails get caught in something.  I continued to observe him & was concerned enough to remove the swing from the Manor & put some padding on the bottom in case he should fall.

He seemed fine in himself & was getting about.  He even sat in Phinny’s cage for a little while but as the day progressed he seemed to get a little worse.  He had difficulty turning on the perch & could not be bothered to go all the way down to his seed pot.  Naturally, I held the seed pot up to him.  I decided that a vet visit was in order, if only to confirm it was a simple sprain & nothing sinister.

Today, Cagney visited the vet.

Read more of this post

Under Pressure

It has been two weeks since Cagney bruised his right leg.  The exotic vet visit was brought forward a day which suited us better.  Cagney was still not using his right leg although he was now stretching it out behind him when stretching his wing out which he was not doing before.

The added problem now was the pressure sore on his left foot as a result of not being able to rest it due to the gammy right leg.  This was getting him down somewhat.  When resting, he would hold his right foot up but slump to the left in a way that I assume he could take pressure off the left foot sore.  He looked rather sorry for himself.  He did not seem to be feeding Atilla as often but would go to her regularly for head preens, like he needed some extra comfort & tender loving care.  Atilla, even though still weak, would always give him a thorough head preen, complete with pulling out feathers that Cagney would want to check before she flung away.

After a bit of a chase, Mr EV was able to examine Cagney & confirmed he had a superficial pressure sore.  He said to give him antibiotics for the next five days to prevent infection.  He agreed that he was slowly regaining use of his right leg.

Mr EV also checked out Atilla & said she was looking better than when he last saw her.  That day was indeed an “up” day for her, where she was accepting seed from me & actually three times that day went down to get seed herself. 🙂  Mr EV advised that on her “down” days to give her some painkiller/anti-inflammatory medication.

The invalids: