Puddings & Toyboys

A blog about my beautiful budgies.

Tag Archives: medicine

Fever

Not long ago, I posted that Perry had a ‘scary turn‘.  Unfortunately, this happened again (almost 4 weeks later).

Perry

On the evening of Monday, June 15th, at around 9:20pm, Perry had another series of ‘turns’, similar to before.  He seemingly lost control of his body & was hurling himself around the cage.  At one point he made a strange, tinny, sound.  When the worst of it was over, he settled on the perch.  However, around midnight, when the lights were dim & their cover was over, he once again fell off the perch & when I turned the light up & investigated, the same thing was happening.  This time, there was less falling (or propelling himself) off the perch but he was twitching, mostly with his head going to one side.  I could see his body wanted to follow the direction his head was taking.

I dimmed the lights again & put the cover down (halfway) in hope that the darkness would be less stimulating & more calming for him.  He was restless until around 2am, when he appeared to settle.  Nevertheless, I slept overnight in the same room to make sure he was okay.  Lennie, understandably, was stressed by his friend’s behaviour & sat on the swing to keep out the way.  We made it through the night without further incident.

You will not be surprised to hear that the vet visited the following day (Tuesday).

She asked many questions about the form Perry’s ‘turns’ took.  I will note the questions below, because at a time when you feel helpless, you could actually observe something that will be key to diagnosing the problem.  When the vet examined Perry, the first thing she noticed was his very high temperature.  It was critical to bring this down within the next 48 hours.  She gave him an injection (Meloxidyl) & also left me with medication (Loxicom) to give orally twice a day for two days.  In case the temperature was caused by an infection, she also put him on a course of antibiotics (Baytril).  She arranged to visit the next day to check his temperature. His weight, similar to last time, was 54g.

Lennie

(Whilst she was here, I asked her to look at Lennie’s wing feathers but I will leave that for another post.)

After the visit & into the next day, they were both very, very quiet & not going to the seed pots to eat (Lennie was stressed), so I offered millet & seeded grass at regular intervals, which they ate.

Thankfully, when the vet took Perry’s temperature about 24 hours later, it was normal!  This was such a relief!  I was to continue with the Loxicom as a precaution, & he still had antibiotics in the water.  The vet said that it may take him a few days to recover as the high temperature had put a strain on his body.

It is possible the temperature had nothing to do with Perry’s ‘turns’, but it obviously needed to be taken care of.  A possibility is that his lump pushes on a nerve that triggers the ‘turn’.  At best, the ‘turns’ are caused by an infection in the kidney that is pumping out toxins, in which case the antibiotics will sort it out.

It is now a few days since the vet came & I have not witnessed any more incidents.  Perry & Lennie are eating by themselves again & gradually getting back to normal.

 

~~~~~

Questions to bear in mind when your bird is having a seizure:

  • Was he/she aware of his/her surroundings during the seizure/s.
  • Did his/her head turn in a circle or to one side?  If to the side, which side?  Was it always the same side?
  • Did he/she make a sound during the seizure & if so, what kind of sound?
  • Did he/she poop or vomit during the seizure?

 

Dalai’s last week (1 of 2)

As previously posted, we lost our dear Dalai on the morning of Wednesday, February 26th.

Dalai preening

I have mentioned before that Dalai had been moulting.  He had the usual moult in October time & recovered well from that.  His next moult was over Christmas which was unexpected.  This was followed by another one in February, also unexpected.  It is thought these successive moults may have weakened his system in some way.

Each time, he was a bit grumpy but that was normal behaviour for him.  When he seemed particularly fed up (not bothering to come out when I unlocked him in the mornings) I would feed him a bobble of millet or six.

On Friday 21st, I he spent a large part of the day in Perry & Lennie’s cage, returning to his own quite late.  I recall thinking that the expression in his eyes did not look quite right, he looked tired.  The following day he barely ate.  On reflection, he must have reduced his food intake in the week prior, but this was difficult to gauge given they share all the seed pots.  His daytime sleeping was interspersed with manic moments of activity (walking upside down across the ceiling of his cage).  I worried that he would not survive the night & kept checking at intervals.

Dalai preening

Leading up to this, his poops were fewer, but bigger, but I was not overly concerned as this change had happened during his previous moults so I assumed the change was temporary.

Because it was the weekend, our usual vet was not available so I spent a frantic time trying to find an exotic vet working the weekend.  We ended up going to the Veterinary Hospital on the Sunday to see a vet with an ‘interest in birds’.  I knew Dalai would have lost weight & because, by now, he was not eating at all, I wanted access to a feeding formula.  On Sunday, the hospital has a process similar to A&E triage, which meant Dalai may be in the waiting room for hours.  I said I did not want this as it would be stressful for him.  They would not release any feeding formula to me without a consultation but agreed to let us wait in a private room to reduce stress.  As it happens, we were seen as soon as we arrived.

As expected, Dalai had lost weight & on her scales weighed 35g.  The vet said he was dehydrated & to orally administer Critical Care, dissolved in water, for a few days before considering a feeding formula.  It was an expensive visit for what seemed like little support & care. Read more of this post

Update on Dalai: 45 days

The last time I posted on Dalai’s health (click here), I stated that we had commenced the 45 day treatment for Chlamydiosis.  This ran from the 1st December 2018 to 14th January 2019.  Treatment was the medicine Ornicure, in water for all three: Dalai, Perry & Lennie.

The medicine was made up 1 litre at a time & kept for 7 days in the fridge.  Apart from ensuring the light-sensitive medicine & solution was measured & stored correctly, administration was really no problem at all.  They all drank the water without any qualms.

The difficulty was all the cleaning that had to be done.  The infectious element is shed in cycles so it is important to have an effective cleaning routine.  Given that they have an awful lot of ‘furniture’, I decided to clean most of it once & then store it away & return it at the end of the treatment.  This has meant we have been living a minimalist lifestyle!

In week one, the playgym took 3 days to dismantle & clean & at the time of writing, has not yet been returned.  As I bagged up newly disinfected items, I marvelled at how many pegs they have & how many beads!

Temporarily, I replaced some wooden perches & the rope perches with easy-to-clean plastic perches.  I replaced their chewy toys with plastic toys.  As paper is easy to replace, I used a lot of crinkle paper & curly paper on the toys to generate interest.

They all continued to moult – each losing a tail feather during December.  Intermittently, Dalai would tail bob, so on those occasions I would nebulise him in the travel cage with F10.

 

A few days after treatment was completed, I arranged another visit from the vet (17th January).  I still had some concerns about intermittent tail bobbing.  The vet checked Dalai over.  His weight was either 45 or 46g.  The vet said that last time she was starting to feel his keel bone so it was good he was back to a healthy weight.  His temperature was also normal, compared to last time when it was slightly raised.  His toenails were fine (no problematic bruising) but were a little long, so they were clipped.  She detected a slight clicking which suggested there was still a lingering respiratory issue.  If linked to the Chlamydia, she said it may take a little longer after the end of treatment for it to clear up.  Because the vet thought Dalai was in otherwise good health & in good spirits, she suggested I continue to nebulise him with F10, as & when the tail bobbing is apparent, but to continue a few days after he improves.

Dalai’s poops 17/1

Dalai’s poops have improved over time.  The initial worrying green colour that prompted the vet to suggest treatment for Chlamydia, has gone.  Of course we still do not know if they had or have Chlamydia, but either way, they all now appear well & happy.

Just so Perry & Lennie were not feeling left out with all the attention the vet was giving Dalai, they both had their toenails trimmed.  Perry, in particular, had a very long toenail that I was concerned about.  Lennie was a very difficult patient & it took the vet & the nurse ages to trim his toenails!

Over the next few weeks I will continue to bring back more of their toys & also the playgym.  I am sure it will not be long before we are completely cluttered again!

Dalai

 

Update on Dalai

Dalai

Following on from my last post on Dalai’s health, he finished the 10 day course of antibiotics (3rd-12th November).  During that time I monitored his droppings & they gradually improved.  He continued to be unsociable, preferring to be in his cage on his own.  He had moments when he wanted to come out but was only out briefly & mostly wanted to just stretch his wings.

He carried on with his moult, losing a tail feather & further wing feathers.  He had lots of pin feathers on his head.  I felt that he wanted a bath but did not want to bother coming out to have one, so a few times I held up a sprig of wet basil & he had an awkward bathe in the wet leaves, as he was trying to do it whilst balancing on his swing!

He had a set-back on the morning of November 16th when his poops were just white splats with no dark bits.  However, by the afternoon they recovered.

The vet provided AviPro Plus, a probiotic to support their gut.  I put this in Dalai’s & Perry & Lennie’s water from the 20th-30th November.  Dalai’s droppings improved & as a bonus, Lennie’s did too (they have always been a bit… not right!)

Dalai ready for F10 nebulising

On the 23rd November, after a further consultation with the vet, she confirmed that videos I sent showed Dalai was definitely tail bobbing (there was slight evidence of this earlier).  We decided to give them all medicine for chlamydia (I refused any invasive tests & also did not bother with the fecal test as a negative result does not necessarily mean they do not have chlamydia).  Whilst awaiting the medicine (it needed to be ordered), the vet suggested I nebulise Dalai a couple of times a day with F10 SC disinfectant to help with any respiratory problems.

The first ‘steaming’ session was on Friday 23rd November at 2pm.  Dalai was difficult to catch in the Silver Villa & when I did grab him he screeched & screamed!  He never did that when the vet grabbed him!  He was not best pleased when he found himself in the travel cage, under a cover, with a bowl of hot water.  (To be clear, the water was outside the cage).  I did this again on the following occasions:

  • 24th November – 10:30
  • 25th November – 10:30, 17:00
  • 26th November – 10:30, 17:30
  • 27th November – 10:00, 17:30
  • 28th November – 10:30
  • 29th November – 10:15

Each time Dalai screeched & screamed when I grabbed him.  After the last two ‘steamings’, he seemed a bit brighter & livelier.  After his steaming on the 28th, he stayed out for a bit & even gave Perry’s head a little preen.

The medicine for chlamydiosis (Ornicure) arrived yesterday, & treatment has commenced.

In the meantime, here is a slideshow for the poop aficionados amongst us.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

And some prettier photos:

 

Bezukhov’s last week

We happily celebrated Bezukhov’s 8th birthday.   We did not know that just hours later things would take a bad turn.

The following morning, on the 28th June, as I uncovered them, I noticed Bezukhov was not himself.  He was quiet & was not eating.  There seemed to be an absence of overnight poops too.  I was concerned enough to call Ms Independent Vet (IV).

After a thorough examination, she suspected he was constipated & could feel a mass that suggested that, along with dried poops just inside his vent.  She administered fluids (orally & by injection under the skin).  Additionally, she gave him an anti-inflammatory injection & a vitamin B boost.  At best, this was simply constipation that would clear within 48 hours.  At worst, something else, something sinister, was causing the constipation.

During the day, I offered lots of different foods: fennel, apple, spinach, basil, celery & millet.  Fennel is his go-to food when not well so it was not a good sign that he refused it.

The following day, he managed a few seeds & a tiny piece of celery leaf & basil.  He seemed quite weak & was constantly fiddling with his bottom area.  At bedtime he ate about 15-20 seeds & also had a slurp of water.

On the 30th, he had slightly more seeds & carried on drinking his water.  He had pooped overnight.  The poops were green & sludgy, so really not good, however it suggested that any blockage was clearing.  He continued to gradually improve, so much so, that the next day (1st July) he started chirping a little & had a brief flirt with Dalai.  He felt well enough to fly over to the playgym & also the window perch.  His poops were still a mess but at least he was pooping.  He was still, in the main, lethargic.  I was still offering all the vegetables listed above, along with broccoli & cucumber.

 

However, the next day (2nd July), he seemed to take a few steps back.  Ms IV visited & thought he seemed a lot better & brighter than when she last saw him (4 days previous).  Though I agreed that he was better than on the 28th, I explained that he was better the previous day so had got worse again.  She said his insides felt clearer & less blocked.  His poops were still of concern & she wondered if perhaps the constipation had caused bacteria to grow.  I was to collect his poops over the next few days in case it was helpful to send them for testing.  She gave him another anti-inflammatory injection & something for nausea.  She also prescribed antibiotics in water for a few days (given that he seemed to be drinking again, which he was not before).

It was all very confusing & worrying…  Read more of this post

Vet visit & medication review

My last report on Bezukhov’s medication situation was at the end of February, when it was agreed with Ms Exotic Hospital Vet (EHV) that all medication would cease.

On the 3rd of March, Bezukhov had his last dose of Destolit.  I would like to say he has not had any more ‘episodes’ but he has.  On the good side, he went for another 6 weeks without any ‘episodes’, but after those rogue 2, he had a clear month then recently had 7 within 5 days.  It was this sudden increase that prompted me to take him back to the vet to review the situation.

Bezukhov in travel cage

Bezukhov in travel cage

Bezukhov in travel cage

Bezukhov in travel cage

So, on Friday 24th June, Bezukhov, once again, visited the vet.  Ms EHV gave him an examination.  He weighs quite a bit now (60g!) but Ms EHV did not think this was a cause for alarm.  He looked, on the face of it, in good health.  He further demonstrated this by breaking free of her grasp & flying around the consulting room.  He landed behind the tap of the sink & Ms EHV quickly retrieved him.  

As I expected, she suggested we run another blood test to see if his recent spate of ‘episodes’ were linked to a downturn in the liver or gallbladder function.  If so, we would return to the previous medication he was on but most probably never come off it.

Because I had reservations about him being put under the anaesthetic in order to obtain the blood sample, Ms EHV suggested an alternative.

The alternative is to give medication when, & only when, Bezukhov has an ‘episode’.  The logic behind this is that we wish to avoid cluster ‘episodes’.  We accept that he may have the odd ‘episode’ here & there & as long as they are brief & the space inbetween is relatively long, then there should not be any long-term health implications.  However, if he has several in one day, or worse, in one hour, then the health risks increase.

So, the new medication (Hypnovel/Midazolam) is to be administered after the 2nd ‘episode’ of the day.  This is by no means an answer but hopefully something that will help to manage the situation with as little stress as possible.

With luck, I will not need to use the new medication, or at least not use it for awhile.

 

Reduced medication update

In December, when I last spoke to Ms Exotic Hospital Vet (EHV), it was agreed to reduce Bezukhov’s medication, to be reviewed the end of January.

Bezukhov

Bezukhov

This new regime began on the 12th December.  He was now to have medication every third day, rather than second day.  The amount of Destolit to stay the same but I reduced the amount of Lactulose.  Unfortunately, after two reduced dosages, in the evening of the 17th December Bezukhov had an ‘episode‘.  He was on my finger at the time & had just finished eating seed.  Phineas went to peck at him & Bezukhov pulled his head back to avoid him but this prompted a reflex type spasm for a brief moment.

He was due medication the next morning so I reverted back to the normal dose whilst I contacted Ms EHV.  She suspected the ‘episode’ was a one-off rather than related to the reduced medication so suggested I carry on with the new regime.  So, three days later I went back to the new regime.  On the 1st January, I stopped giving him Lactulose completely, so now it was just Destolit (for his gallbladder) every third day.

Yesterday, I spoke to Ms EHV to review how things were.  He has not had any more ‘episodes’ since the 17th December & apart from having another moult, seems in otherwise good health.  She suggested we stop the Destolit too, in other words, no medication.  Scary!

However, because he is currently going through a moult, we agreed to stop the medication when he is back to his normal self.  When this happens I will be monitoring him more closely than ever!

 

 

 

 

 

Bezukhov health update

Bezukhov

Bezukhov

Two days ago, I spoke with Ms Exotic Hospital Vet (EHV).  We had previously planned to reassess Bezukhov’s medication regime in November.  With the loss of Cagney, a major moult & significant weight loss, I deliberately delayed this to wait until Bezukhov was in better shape, both physically & mentally.

It is understood that Bezukhov needs more blood tests to determine how his liver & gallbladder are functioning.  He was last tested at the beginning of June.  At the moment, I am reluctant to put him through the ordeal of another one.  Though Bezukhov is in much better spirits after all the recent upset, I feel he is still adjusting & do not want to stress him further if it is not absolutely necessary.

With that in mind, & also the fact that I have not witnessed any ‘episodes’ in recent months, we agreed to gradually reduce his medication.   If he starts having ‘episodes’ again, then he will be straight back on the old regime.  It was agreed to stop giving him the Lactulose (the sticky medicine to support his liver) but continue with the Destolit (for gallbladder) every 3 days (not every other day).

All being well, to be reviewed at the end of January 2016.

I find this a scary change.  Clearly the medicine, over time, has stabilised him.  If possible, we want to reduce the medication, yet at the same time do not want to upset the status quo.  Either way, I will continue to watch my beautiful boy closely.

 

Medication & the Ferplast

Manor with cover that I stand underneath

Manor with cover that I stand underneath

With the manor, I had a routine established regarding giving Bezukhov his every-other-morning medication.  Though the cage is big, the large front door allows me access to all areas.  To stop Bezukhov escaping out that big door, I wrap a sheet around myself & the cage.  Once he is safely contained in my hands, I duck under the sheet, into the light, to administer medication (or more to the point try to administer medication).

Bezukhov would then be returned to the manor where he could take his time to recover.

Since Bezukhov has been sleeping overnight in the Ferplast, things have been tricky.  The Ferplast has some good points but sadly the cage is not designed for catching Bezukhov.  It has two small doors on the front, that only one hand/arm can fit.  If I position my left arm in the left door & my right arm in the right door, I still do not have access to all areas of the cage.  For example, if Bezukhov is at the far left, I am unable to bend my left arm around, which means I have to use my right arm but as it is in the right door, it does not fully reach the left side of the cage.  [Are you keeping up?!]   The alternative is to put the most suitable arm in the appropriate door (left or right) during the chase, but this carries the risk of leaving the unused door open for Bezukhov to cunningly escape through.

Even when I am lucky enough to grab Bezukhov, I then need the other hand to contain him, otherwise he wriggles free in no time.  In summary, a stressful job got even more stressful.

I don't want any medicine!!

I don’t want any medicine!!

 

So, can I somehow get Bezukhov to sleep overnight in the Manor, particularly the night before medication-morning?  Well, if he was to go in there at a convenient time in the evening & I lock him in, he gets stressed being on his own.  He rarely goes near the Manor in the evening though as he now eats his bedtime seed in the Ferplast.  Phineas generally does not consider sleeping overnight in the Manor & why would he?  He has a perfectly comfortable set up in the Ferplast.  And do not forget that apart from when Thomas was around, he has been sleeping on his own so is used to it.

So, for the time being we are muddling along…

 

 

Medicine & millet

Previously, I reported on Cagney’s return from the hospital (click here).

  • Follow-up vet visit

On Tuesday 25th, we saw our regular vet, Ms Exotic Hospital Vet (EHV).  She confirmed that the barium x-ray did not show any obstruction.  An examination of his poops at the hospital did not show any parasites or anything to be worried about.  She examined Cagney again & said his temperature was still high, though lower than before.  His weight was the same.  Otherwise, she thought he looked generally brighter than when she last saw him on the Saturday.

  • Medicine

It was decided that Cagney have metacam orally (0.03ml), twice a day – mainly to bring his temperature down.  This is to be administered every 12 hours.  As he had a dose during the consultation, that meant approximately 9am & 9pm for the next 4 days.  She also wanted to include an antibiotic (baytril – 0.03ml) in the 9pm medication battle slot for a week.   Medicine to be reassessed during follow-up visit a week later.

  • How to administer medicine!

Cagney feels very different to hold than Bezukhov – more fragile – so I expressed concern about getting the medicine inside him, not to mention attempting to catch him at 9pm when he has worked out that going back to ‘bed’ means he will be caught again.  She said I could bring him to the surgery twice a day where a vet or nurse could give the medicine.  I seriously considered this for a moment!  In the end, we decided that I would give him the medicine in front of her & she would tell me what I was doing wrong!

We used the cloth method, which I have discounted with Bezukhov as he manages to burrow down into it!  With Cagney, the cloth seemed to be the way to go.  She suggested holding his head between my thumb & index finger.  Cagney still managed to turn so I was pointing the syringe at the back of his head (the film The Exorcist comes to mind…), but after much maneouvring I managed to squirt the medicine in his beak.

To make things slightly easier, Ms EHV trimmed Cagney’s toenails to limit the chances of them getting caught in the cloth.

  • Progress

Read more of this post