Puddings & Toyboys

A blog about my beautiful budgies.

Tag Archives: temperature

Fever

Not long ago, I posted that Perry had a ‘scary turn‘.  Unfortunately, this happened again (almost 4 weeks later).

Perry

On the evening of Monday, June 15th, at around 9:20pm, Perry had another series of ‘turns’, similar to before.  He seemingly lost control of his body & was hurling himself around the cage.  At one point he made a strange, tinny, sound.  When the worst of it was over, he settled on the perch.  However, around midnight, when the lights were dim & their cover was over, he once again fell off the perch & when I turned the light up & investigated, the same thing was happening.  This time, there was less falling (or propelling himself) off the perch but he was twitching, mostly with his head going to one side.  I could see his body wanted to follow the direction his head was taking.

I dimmed the lights again & put the cover down (halfway) in hope that the darkness would be less stimulating & more calming for him.  He was restless until around 2am, when he appeared to settle.  Nevertheless, I slept overnight in the same room to make sure he was okay.  Lennie, understandably, was stressed by his friend’s behaviour & sat on the swing to keep out the way.  We made it through the night without further incident.

You will not be surprised to hear that the vet visited the following day (Tuesday).

She asked many questions about the form Perry’s ‘turns’ took.  I will note the questions below, because at a time when you feel helpless, you could actually observe something that will be key to diagnosing the problem.  When the vet examined Perry, the first thing she noticed was his very high temperature.  It was critical to bring this down within the next 48 hours.  She gave him an injection (Meloxidyl) & also left me with medication (Loxicom) to give orally twice a day for two days.  In case the temperature was caused by an infection, she also put him on a course of antibiotics (Baytril).  She arranged to visit the next day to check his temperature. His weight, similar to last time, was 54g.

Lennie

(Whilst she was here, I asked her to look at Lennie’s wing feathers but I will leave that for another post.)

After the visit & into the next day, they were both very, very quiet & not going to the seed pots to eat (Lennie was stressed), so I offered millet & seeded grass at regular intervals, which they ate.

Thankfully, when the vet took Perry’s temperature about 24 hours later, it was normal!  This was such a relief!  I was to continue with the Loxicom as a precaution, & he still had antibiotics in the water.  The vet said that it may take him a few days to recover as the high temperature had put a strain on his body.

It is possible the temperature had nothing to do with Perry’s ‘turns’, but it obviously needed to be taken care of.  A possibility is that his lump pushes on a nerve that triggers the ‘turn’.  At best, the ‘turns’ are caused by an infection in the kidney that is pumping out toxins, in which case the antibiotics will sort it out.

It is now a few days since the vet came & I have not witnessed any more incidents.  Perry & Lennie are eating by themselves again & gradually getting back to normal.

 

~~~~~

Questions to bear in mind when your bird is having a seizure:

  • Was he/she aware of his/her surroundings during the seizure/s.
  • Did his/her head turn in a circle or to one side?  If to the side, which side?  Was it always the same side?
  • Did he/she make a sound during the seizure & if so, what kind of sound?
  • Did he/she poop or vomit during the seizure?

 

Bezukhov’s last week

We happily celebrated Bezukhov’s 8th birthday.   We did not know that just hours later things would take a bad turn.

The following morning, on the 28th June, as I uncovered them, I noticed Bezukhov was not himself.  He was quiet & was not eating.  There seemed to be an absence of overnight poops too.  I was concerned enough to call Ms Independent Vet (IV).

After a thorough examination, she suspected he was constipated & could feel a mass that suggested that, along with dried poops just inside his vent.  She administered fluids (orally & by injection under the skin).  Additionally, she gave him an anti-inflammatory injection & a vitamin B boost.  At best, this was simply constipation that would clear within 48 hours.  At worst, something else, something sinister, was causing the constipation.

During the day, I offered lots of different foods: fennel, apple, spinach, basil, celery & millet.  Fennel is his go-to food when not well so it was not a good sign that he refused it.

The following day, he managed a few seeds & a tiny piece of celery leaf & basil.  He seemed quite weak & was constantly fiddling with his bottom area.  At bedtime he ate about 15-20 seeds & also had a slurp of water.

On the 30th, he had slightly more seeds & carried on drinking his water.  He had pooped overnight.  The poops were green & sludgy, so really not good, however it suggested that any blockage was clearing.  He continued to gradually improve, so much so, that the next day (1st July) he started chirping a little & had a brief flirt with Dalai.  He felt well enough to fly over to the playgym & also the window perch.  His poops were still a mess but at least he was pooping.  He was still, in the main, lethargic.  I was still offering all the vegetables listed above, along with broccoli & cucumber.

 

However, the next day (2nd July), he seemed to take a few steps back.  Ms IV visited & thought he seemed a lot better & brighter than when she last saw him (4 days previous).  Though I agreed that he was better than on the 28th, I explained that he was better the previous day so had got worse again.  She said his insides felt clearer & less blocked.  His poops were still of concern & she wondered if perhaps the constipation had caused bacteria to grow.  I was to collect his poops over the next few days in case it was helpful to send them for testing.  She gave him another anti-inflammatory injection & something for nausea.  She also prescribed antibiotics in water for a few days (given that he seemed to be drinking again, which he was not before).

It was all very confusing & worrying…  Read more of this post

Relapse

An unwell Bezukhov

An unwell Bezukhov

One day feather loss

One day feather loss

Medication

Medication

We have had a difficult time with Bezukhov.  After I posted that Bezukhov had become unwell (click here to read that post), the hopeful signs of improvement stopped.  On the 29th September, Bezukhov began a heavy moult.  Almost overnight there were feathers everywhere.  He lost mountains of small fluffy feathers, several larger feathers, including flight feathers & a tail feather.  At the same time, his poops got worse again.  He also stopped eating.

He was extremely lethargic & I was sufficiently worried to call in Ms Independent Vet (IV) who visited on the 30th September.

Once again, she suspected the problems were a continuation of stress from losing his friend Phineas, but now with the added complication of going into a heavy moult.  She weighed him & he was only 44g, so a loss of approximately 14g in 9 days.  His temperature was very high, but otherwise she could not find anything else obviously wrong.  She gave him an injection of anti-inflammatory to help bring down his temperature & also antibiotics to guard against infections whilst his immune system was low.  I was to orally give him the anti-inflammatory (Loxicom) twice a day for the next 3 days & antibiotics (Baytril) once a day for the next 7 days.  She also advised that I steam/nebulise him with F10 as she thought his breathing was a bit laboured.  She also gave me Emeraid, so I could syringe feed him to get his weight back up.

Of course giving Bezukhov medicine is a challenge.  Despite being unwell he still managed to do his very best to avoid taking anything orally.

I was marginally better at giving Bezukhov the medicine than the Emeraid.  Some birds will apparently eat Emeraid when offered as it is a nice smelling (& probably nice tasting) porridge-like substance.  I did offer him some on my finger but he refused so I was left with having to syringe feed him.  I tried my very, very best to give him the food but he pulled out all the stops & thwarted me at every twist & turn.  I managed to get a few drops inside him now & then.  Ms IV advised that I give him the Emeraid morning & evening but because I could hardly get any inside him, I added another battle session in the middle of the day.

Despite my best efforts, Bezukhov got worse.

Read more of this post

Medicine & millet

Previously, I reported on Cagney’s return from the hospital (click here).

  • Follow-up vet visit

On Tuesday 25th, we saw our regular vet, Ms Exotic Hospital Vet (EHV).  She confirmed that the barium x-ray did not show any obstruction.  An examination of his poops at the hospital did not show any parasites or anything to be worried about.  She examined Cagney again & said his temperature was still high, though lower than before.  His weight was the same.  Otherwise, she thought he looked generally brighter than when she last saw him on the Saturday.

  • Medicine

It was decided that Cagney have metacam orally (0.03ml), twice a day – mainly to bring his temperature down.  This is to be administered every 12 hours.  As he had a dose during the consultation, that meant approximately 9am & 9pm for the next 4 days.  She also wanted to include an antibiotic (baytril – 0.03ml) in the 9pm medication battle slot for a week.   Medicine to be reassessed during follow-up visit a week later.

  • How to administer medicine!

Cagney feels very different to hold than Bezukhov – more fragile – so I expressed concern about getting the medicine inside him, not to mention attempting to catch him at 9pm when he has worked out that going back to ‘bed’ means he will be caught again.  She said I could bring him to the surgery twice a day where a vet or nurse could give the medicine.  I seriously considered this for a moment!  In the end, we decided that I would give him the medicine in front of her & she would tell me what I was doing wrong!

We used the cloth method, which I have discounted with Bezukhov as he manages to burrow down into it!  With Cagney, the cloth seemed to be the way to go.  She suggested holding his head between my thumb & index finger.  Cagney still managed to turn so I was pointing the syringe at the back of his head (the film The Exorcist comes to mind…), but after much maneouvring I managed to squirt the medicine in his beak.

To make things slightly easier, Ms EHV trimmed Cagney’s toenails to limit the chances of them getting caught in the cloth.

  • Progress

Read more of this post

A very long 24 hours

Cagney has not been well.

Last week he generally seemed a bit off colour but I put that down to his moult:

 

White splattered poops

White splattered poops

On the Friday (21st August), he seemed to have lost his appetite.  He was still eating but not as much.  He seemed a bit wobbly on the perch.  His poops were starting to look wrong too – mostly white.  The pink bits in his feet were starting to go white.  All these things reminded me of when I took him to the vet on the Easter Bank Holiday Monday (click here).  At that time, it was thought he was suffering from his moult & he was given a vitamin injection & gradually improved over the following days.  I thought that may be the problem this time.

The next day, Saturday (22nd August), Cagney’s overnight poops were definitely off.  The pink bits in his feet were still pale.  Worse than all that, he stopped eating.  I offered him millet that he refused point blank to eat.  Within minutes I was on the phone to the vet.  Fortunately, Ms Exotic Hospital Vet (EHV) was working that afternoon so I booked him in.

 

When we arrived, we had to wait awhile as an emergency had come in – a dog that had been collapsing.  The dog was to be sent to the hospital.  Whilst waiting, I was saying to the receptionist how handy it was to have a 24 hour hospital…

Cagney’s turn finally came & Ms EHV gave him a thorough examination.  He weighed 43g.  The highest weight she had for him was 47g so she thought this was potentially a problem.  His heart rate was very fast – too fast.  His temperature was high.   She said he was a ‘sick bird‘.

Because of his white poops, she feared he had an obstruction.  (I forgot to say that he had also been constantly cleaning his vent area even though it appeared clean).  She checked his vent (well, that is where the thermometer goes…) & said it looked clean.  She could not feel any obstruction.  She wanted him to have a barium x-ray to check his digestive tract.  This would mean several x-ray’s over a number of hours & therefore at least a 24 hour stay in the hospital.

The thought of him being taken away scared me & all sorts of thoughts raced through my head.  Ms EHV said that it was very important his temperature came down & I could take him home with me but he should have his temperature checked again the following day.  Also, IF he had an obstruction of some kind it would need to be dealt with sooner rather than later.  She repeated that he was a ‘sick bird ‘.

I gave her the go-ahead to take him to the hospital.

She said that she would personally start the x-ray process but then the night staff would take over.  She would give me a ring that evening to let me know a good time to visit.  Leaving the vet, without Cagney, damn near broke my heart, especially as I had told Bezukhov & Phineas that “Cagney will be back before you know it…

 

To be continued….